Honors & Awards

Academic Honors

Aimee Edmondson as Outstanding Graduate Faculty RecipientTop Faculty Paper, Minorities and Communication Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, Washington, D.C., August 2013, for “At the intersection of libel and race: Aaron Henry picks up a hitchhiker?”

2013 Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award, a university-wide honor that goes to a professor who has demonstrated exemplary performance as an instructor, a researcher and a faculty member. The recipient serves as the graduate commencement speaker the following year.

2011 N. Victor Goodman Honors Tutorial College Award, given to a faculty member at Ohio University during their first three years of tutoring Honors students. The award is given on the basis of quality of the tutor’s instruction as evidenced by student evaluations and observations of administrators. (Tutored 17 undergraduate honors students in Communication Law during first three years at Ohio.)

J. William Snorgrass Award for the Outstanding Paper on a Minorities Topic, American Journalism Historians Association, Tucson, October 2010, for “Making Whiteness: Racial Defamation and the Negro Moniker.”

Honorable mention, David Sloan Award for the Outstanding Faculty Paper, American Journalism Historians Association, Tucson, October 2010, for “Making Whiteness: Racial Defamation and the Negro Moniker.”

Honorable mention, American Journalism Historians Association Margaret A. Blanchard Doctoral Dissertation Prize. Presented dissertation at the annual AJHA conference in Birmingham, Alabama, October 6-8, 2009.

Second Place Faculty Paper, History Division, Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, August 2009, for “In Sullivan’s Shadow: The Use and Abuse of Libel Law During the Civil Rights Movement.”

Third Place Paper, Minorities and Communication Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, San Francisco, August 2006, for “Objectivity and The Journalist’s Creed: Local coverage of Lucile Bluford’s fight to enter the Missouri School of Journalism.”

REPORTING AWARDS

Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism ($1,000). National award for reporting on children and families for “Born to Die.” Conducted original research that showed Memphis has the highest infant mortality rate among the nation’s 60 largest U.S. cities. The 10-month project ran in three ad-free special sections on consecutive Sundays. 2006.

Green Eyeshade Excellence in Journalism Award. The Society of Professional Journalists. First place, investigative reporting for “Born to Die.” Competition of working journalists in 11 southeastern states. 2006.

Education Writers Association national citation.

Third place, 2003. For series of stories on K-12 teachers who cheat in the wake of high stakes school reform. Conducted a survey of 11,000 city and county teachers on their attitudes and behaviors as part of the project, which placed third behind The Wall Street Journal and Philadelphia Inquirer. This story also garnered the 2003 School Bell Award given by the teachers’ union, the Tennessee Education Association.

Scripps Howard In-house Awards:

The Best of Scripps, Quarterly Awards ($1,000)

Spot News, Second Quarter 2005. For team coverage of the FBI sting “Operation Tennessee Waltz” that led to the indictments of five state legislators on corruption charges.

Specialty Reporting, First Quarter 2005. Awarded for “Born to Die.”

The Best of Scripps, Annual Awards ($1,000)

Spot News, 2004. For team coverage of an Arkansas bus wreck that killed 15 passengers after the driver fell asleep at the wheel.

Specialty Reporting, First Quarter 2005.  Awarded for “Born to Die.”

The Best of Scripps, Annual  Awards ($1,000)

Spot News. 2004. For team coverage of an Arkansas bus wreck that killed 15 passengers after the driver fell asleep at the wheel.

The Best of Scripps, Monthly Awards ($250)

Enterprise Reporting, February 2004. For feature story “Women Who Protect Us,” about female police, firefighters and paramedics who are changing the face of public safety in Memphis post 9/11.

Spot News, July 2003. Team coverage of “Hurricane Elvis,” actually hurricane-strength straightline winds that ripped through Memphis, leaving thousands without power for weeks.

Spot News, June 2003. For extensive coverage of the death of a Memphis toddler, forgotten in a sweltering day care van. Stories helped lead to the reform of Tennessee’s subsidized day care industry.

Specialty Reporting, November 2002. For an investigation of a high-priced plan to revamp Memphis City Schools’ air conditioning systems. The story showed how the job could be done for half of the amount planned. The city schools scrapped that original plan after the stories ran and rebid the project for millions in savings.

Enterprise Reporting, June 2001. Spent a semester in one of Memphis’ lowest performing schools, showing daily life here, amid the national debate about school quality.

Specialty Reporting, February 2001. For feature on a high-discipline school in the Bronx that became a model for a new program in Memphis, showing how great teaching can help break the poverty cycle.

Enterprise Reporting, June 1999. For several stories showing inequities in Memphis’ property reappraisal program (with Louis Graham).

Tennessee Associated Press Managing Editors:

Malcolm Law Investigative reporting award, 2006, for Born to Die infant mortality series.

First place, non-deadline reporting, 2001. For the story of a semester in a low-performing school. The story also won the 2001 Award for Excellence in Education Reporting given by the Tennessee School Boards Association.

Georgia Associated Press

Third place, features, 1993. For a series published in The Augusta Chronicle on women in the military. Followed women at the co-educational Georgia Military College in the wake of Shannon Faulkner’s legal battle for entrance into The Citadel. This story also garnered Feature of the Year and Story of the Year at The Chronicle and $2,000.

Associated Press awards while working for The Griffin Daily News, the small newspaper division: First place, features, 1992; Second place, features, 1992; Third place, public service, 1992.

Society of Professional Journalists, Augusta, Ga. chapter.

Cindy Pleasant’s Award for Humanitarian Journalism, 1993.

First place, feature reporting, 1994.

Employee of the Month, The Augusta Chronicle, July 1994.

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